Recent Posts

Milking cookies: The FTC's $22.5 million settlement with Google

There’s been a lot of talk about breaking records these past few weeks.  But here’s one you won’t see on the sports pages:  the FTC’s $22.5 million settlement with Google, the largest civil penalty ever against a single defendant.  The penalty stems from FTC charges that Google didn’t give users of Apple’s Safari Internet browser the straight story about the use of tracking cookies.  That, says the FTC, violated the terms of Google’s 2011 privacy settlement.

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Where HireRight Solutions went wrong

Most job seekers are familiar with the basics:  Wear a clean shirt, extend a firm handshake, and don’t ask about vacations in the first 10 minutes of the interview.  But these days more businesses are digging deeper.  Tulsa-based HireRight Solutions is a background screening company that thousands of employers use to check out current employees and people applying for jobs.  When it comes to Fair Credit Reporting Act compliance, the FTC says HireRight Solutions got it wrong by not using reasonable procedures to ensure the accuracy of the inform

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Pets, Vets, and Retail Outlets

Last year, U.S. pet owners spent over $50 billion on their pets.  That’s a lot of puppy chow, chew toys, and rhinestone collars.  But it also reflects significant expenditures for pet health products and services, including veterinary office visits and medicines.  In fact, in 2011 American consumers spent nearly $7 billion on pet medications alone. 

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Check out the latest in the Qchex case

If you’ve been following the ongoing story of the FTC’s law enforcement action stemming from Neovi, Inc.'s Qchex check-writing system, the Court’s recent contempt ruling will make for interesting reading.  If those names aren’t familiar to you — and you have clients in the payments arena — it’s time to get up to speed.

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COPPA: A second helping

The FTC asked for your input and you chimed in with 350 comments about the future of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule.  Based on what you said — and what we’ve learned through law enforcement — we’re back, asking for your help in thinking through modifications to certain definitions to clarify the scope of the Rule and strengthen its protections.

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