What kids’ apps won’t tell parents (but we will)

Consumers have made it clear: They want to know what their apps are up to.  And when it comes to apps for kids, italicize that, put it in ALL CAPS, and multiply by 10.  That’s why the FTC has released a new way of letting parents know just what their kids’ apps may be doing.  Savvy app developers will want to take a look, too.

Keeping Up with Kids’ Apps is a new infographic highlighting findings from the FTC staff report, Mobile Apps for Kids: Disclosures Still Not Making the Grade.  For example, apps might let kids spend real money even if the app itself is free.  According to the Report, of the kids’ apps in the study that allow in-app purchases, 84% are free to download.  In addition, 59% collect or share personal info, but only 11% tell you that.  58% include ads, a fact only 9% reveal.  22% link to social media, but only 9% disclose that to parents.

The infographic also includes specific steps Moms and Dads can take at home, in the app store, and on their phone or tablet to make sure they’re in charge when it comes to their kids’ use of apps.

What else is new about the infographic?  A picture being a thousand words and all, take a look for yourself.  Government visuals have come a long way since the days of "27 8×10 color glossy pictures with circles and arrows and a paragraph on the back explaining what each one was."  (Thank you, Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant.")

Looking for more compliance resources?  Read Mobile App Developers: Start with Security and Marketing Your Mobile App: Get it Right from the Start.  Bookmark the Business Center's Children's Privacy page.

 

5 Comments

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This is what happens when you let government give you more protection. In getting more protection you get to lose more and more of your liberties, Obama voters are so dumb. More and more of your liberties are being taken away because you want more and more government intervention. Sad.

its not right how are we going to talk to each other you are so smart you are worried about kids what about adults some of them are crazy and stalkers what if the adults get into trouble will you just say they can help them selves you find a way with kids help i know you have seen poor people on the streets and you do not help them back on their feet so why talk know that is what you would have did if you cared so much

This is what happens when you let government give you more protection. In getting more protection you get to lose more and more of your liberties, Obama voters are so dumb. More and more of your liberties are being taken away because you want more and more government intervention. Sad.

Wake up sheeple! Before you know it you will be like that live shrimp just taking a bath in a pot of water. The heats turned on real low and before you know it, you're cooked.

Uhh..... what if its 4 days to your birthday in turning 13 and you still can't create an email account. I mean, you guys should like make a mini test of "maturity" instead of let them type their age (LOTSA ppl lie, IT'S NOT EVEN FUNNY.) For example, if a child is REALLY mature, and obviously they pass the maturity test, they should be allowed to create an email account, even if they are only 12 or 11 or something.

*I hold no insults or offenses, and no interrogations, questionings, or any sort of abuse such as spam should and will not be held against me. I am not responsible for any insults and offenses. Any questions should not be directed to me, as this is just a comment. Finding my IP address, computer address, home address, and any form of stalking or finding information about me will be considered and offense to me.

you should take off this policy because most kids are more advanced than others and understand the policy and circumstances of things like this. And kids who have accounts like yahoo's and gmail's should have a supervisor to watch over them to make sure everything is okay.
-#Unknown

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