And now a word from our sponsor: FTC announces "native ad" workshop

It used to be pretty clear.  The entertainment portion of a show ended and the commercials began.  The two-column article ran on one side of the newspaper and the ad ran on the other.  Or the webpage had the content in the middle with a banner ad running across the top.  Things are more complicated now.  Some call it “native advertising” or “sponsored content.”  Whatever the name, it’s for sure ads in digital media are starting to look a lot like the surrounding content.  What are the consumer protection implications now that

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Practicing what we preach

"Disclose the cost upfront."  We tell businesses that all the time, so it’s important we follow our own advice.  In that spirit, fees for telemarketers accessing the National Do Not Call Registry are going up a smidge as of October 1, 2013.

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You're on Candid Camera

But according to an FTC lawsuit alleging lax security by a company selling internet cameras, for the hundreds of consumers whose private lives were watched online, there was nothing to smile about.

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CARdinal rules for online advertisers

If there are strings attached to a particular deal, those material terms and conditions have to be clearly and conspicuously disclosed up front. That well-settled legal principle applies to online ads. It applies to car ads.  And so (QED) it applies to online car ads. That should come as no surprise to savvy marketers. But two FTC settlements underscore it, highlight it, and festoon it with multi-colored pennants for members of the auto industry — and other advertisers, too.

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FTC files data security complaint against LabMD

If your clients are focused on data security — and they should be — here’s a development they’ll want to know about.  The FTC just filed an administrative complaint against Atlanta-based LabMD.  The company does lab work for people across the country when their local doctors send in samples for testing.  The primary allegation:  that the company failed to reasonably protect the security of consumers’ personal data, including medical information.

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