CARdinal rules for online advertisers

If there are strings attached to a particular deal, those material terms and conditions have to be clearly and conspicuously disclosed up front. That well-settled legal principle applies to online ads. It applies to car ads.  And so (QED) it applies to online car ads. That should come as no surprise to savvy marketers. But two FTC settlements underscore it, highlight it, and festoon it with multi-colored pennants for members of the auto industry — and other advertisers, too.

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FTC files data security complaint against LabMD

If your clients are focused on data security — and they should be — here’s a development they’ll want to know about.  The FTC just filed an administrative complaint against Atlanta-based LabMD.  The company does lab work for people across the country when their local doctors send in samples for testing.  The primary allegation:  that the company failed to reasonably protect the security of consumers’ personal data, including medical information.

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FTC's Jamster case: 5 tips for mobile marketers

So people were taking a few minutes to play the free version of Angry Birds on their Android device.  At some point between the Giant Slingshot and the Mighty Eagle, they got a "Virus Detected" warning.  But according to an FTC lawsuit, that scary-looking security alert was phony and just a way for Jamster (the court papers use the corporate name Jesta Digital) to place charges on people's cell phone bills without

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Surely you Jesta: Jamster jammed for mobile cramming

You thought Angry Birds get peeved at those annoying green pigs?  That's nothing compared to consumers’ reaction when they found unauthorized charges “crammed” onto their cell phone bills for phony virus scans that showed up when they played Angry Birds on their Android devices.  To settle an FTC lawsuit, Jesta Digital LLC — you may know them as Jamster — will give refunds to a significant number of consumers, pay an additional $1.2 million, and change the way they do business.

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Welcome back, COPPA

Rerun watchers will remember “Welcome Back, Kotter,” a schoolroom sitcom featuring a hummable theme by folk rocker John Sebastian and a cast of smart-alecky students.  The character of Juan Epstein was famous for forging excuse notes and permission slips and claiming they were from his mother.  What tipped off Mr. Kotter was that the letters always ended with “Signed, Juan Epstein’s Mother.”  OK, it’s a stretch, but there’s a connection between that 70s sitcom and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule.

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